Our History

Celebrating our past

The Scots School Albury, through its founding schools, is one of the oldest schools in New South Wales and the oldest country Boarding School in the State. Our School’s story began on the 22nd of July 1866, when a Church of England Grammar School opened with just 14 students on the Corner of Dean and Kiewa Streets, Albury. The Grammar School offered an independent primary and secondary school education for some 15 years. In 1881 the government withdrew funding from Independent Schools, thus forcing the senior school of the Grammar School to close. The Grammar School continued to operate as a primary school until 1885. Following the closure of the Grammar School, its headmaster Joseph Masters moved to establish Albury High School at his home in Young Street. The School offered co-educational tuition at a secondary level through to matriculation. While the School was considered to be co-educational, girls attended classes in the mornings and boys in the afternoons.

Our foundation as a traditional, yet modern, place of education ensures our students gain from our experience and history as a co-educational independent Boarding School. 2020 and beyond will see further development and innovation through future-focused learning experiences that we offer our students to enable them to thrive in what is a rapidly changing world.

Six years later, Masters sold Albury High School.  The new proprietors, James Bailey Wilson and Alfred John Smith, re-opened the School with just seven pupils on the roll. By the end of that year, enrolments increased to 30 day students and five boarders. The School was renamed and became Albury Grammar School. Meanwhile, the first private school for girls, Glenair, opened in 1892, followed by Albury Ladies College in 1898.  Glenair and Albury Ladies College were sold in 1910 and became Springfield Girls School. Springfield Girls School closed in 1916 and in 1926 Rosehill Girls School was opened. Back at Albury Grammar, Wilson became the sole proprietor of the School in 1902 when Smith was tragically killed in a buggy accident. Wilson moved the premises of Albury Grammar School to the School’s current site on Perry Street in 1909 to meet the needs of the growing School. Wilson retired in 1929 after 42 years as Headmaster. He sold Albury Grammar to the Presbyterian Church and Albury Grammar became a school only for boys.

The story was much the same at Rosehill. Rosehill Girls School was sold in 1939, but facilities were relatively poor and overcrowded. The School was relocated to a seven-acre property in Schubach Street, East Albury. Rosehill was renamed and became the Woodstock School for Girls.Albury Grammar continued to prosper under the leadership of Alexander Sellars who was appointed Headmaster in 1938 and celebrated its Centenary in 1966. To celebrate the milestone, Albury Grammar built a four-faced clock tower and refectory building.

1972 saw the amalgamation of Albury Grammar School and Woodstock Presbyterian Ladies College and The Scots School Albury was born. The newly named Scots School adopted the crest of Albury Grammar and the motto of Woodstock – Fide et Literis – faith and learning. Our affiliation with the Uniting Church began in 1977 and over the following forty years The Scots School Albury has provided an exceptional education for young people from across Regional NSW and North East Victoria. Our foundation as a traditional, yet modern, place of education ensures our students gain from our experience and history as a co-educational independent Boarding School. 

2020 and beyond will see further development and innovation through future-focused learning experiences that we offer our students to enable them to thrive in what is a rapidly changing world.